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The Nut

posted 7 Mar 2017, 17:12 by Christopher Gibbings   [ updated 8 Mar 2017, 16:01 by Peter Harney ]
Apart from the above, it may be said that we are all a bit ‘nuts’, and it may be very helpful to stay that way!
I think, after my propagating many of them, we could have a Bunya Planting Festival in April/May 2017?

The small nut (each one the scale of the larger cone) develops around a soft core, each one attached to the core and to each other – they are individual, sharing the essence.

The very sizeable nut/cone, takes the shape of the tree itself, with it's distinctive flavour and high nutritional value, could be described as the quintessential bush tucker.

Over thousands of years aboriginal people have
gathered from such huge distances to celebrate
when the nut was in season is testament to its value
both as a food and as a unifying symbol of Aboriginal culture. the traditional people and culture of this land.

The nut is 40% water, 40% complex carbohydrates, 9% protein, 2% fat, 0.2% potassium, 0.06% magnesium and contains approx. 32 calories and gluten free.

The nut can be boiled or roasted, and make a great pesto; there are many varied recipes for the use of the nut - savoury and sweet dishes. It is one of the most versatile and useful of all our native foods - soups, casseroles, quiches, pies, pastas, vegetables, desserts, cakes, biscuits, bread, damper, scones, pikelets, pastry, lollies and porridge.

The simplest way to prepare Bunya nuts for eating is to put them in a saucepan of water and boil for about half an hour. Remove from the water and split open while still hot. Remove from the shell and serve with butter (pepper and salt if required). They may be eaten cold, but are better hot.

Apart from the above, it may be said that we are all a bit ‘nuts’, and it may be very helpful to stay that way!
I think, after my propagating many of them, we could have a Bunya Planting Festival in April/May 2017?

Julian Maher 
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